Marshall Slocum Inn
Marshall Slocum Inn
Arrive
Depart

Broadway Restaurants

June 20th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

When visiting Newport, most people tend to head down towards Thames Street and the Wharf area to grab a bite to eat and it can get pretty busy.  If you’re looking for something a little different head to Broadway, which is less than a half a mile from the Marshall Slocum Inn.  There are a bunch of different restaurants that will feed whatever you’re craving that day.  Here is a list of just a few of the great Broadway Restaurants:

The Fifth Element: The Fifth Element is a “casual-hip hangout” where bar meets grill.  The atmosphere is warm and welcoming, with eath tones, water walls and a combination of rustic and industrial decor.  You can enjoy live music here or just the company of those around you.  Dinner options include Fresh Tagliatelle and House Made Beer Braut. 111 Broadway.

Salvation Cafe: Salvation Cafe is an eclectic restaurant servings creative dishes.  They have a very unique and fun atmosphere.  Dishes include Oxtail Bolognese, Buttermilk Brick Chicken and Vegan Risotto. 140 Broadway.

Norey’s: The goal of Norey’s Chef, Tyler Cullen, was to create a memorable night out by introducing Newport to the very best craft beers, the finest wines and a dynamic Modern-American menu.  They have a huge craft beer selection and dishes such as Lobster Mac and Cheese and Thai Curry Stir Fry. 156 Broadway.

Pour Judgement: Pour Judgement is a popular bar where you can have “a night out without spending a days pay,” and is popular with the Newport Locals.  They have a great beer selection, delicious food and a great atmosphere. 32 Broadway.

The SVF Foundation’s Annual Visitors Day

June 13th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

On Saturday, June 14th, the SVF Foundation will be opening its doors to the public for their annual visitors day celebration.  The event will take place on their 35-acre property near Fort Adams State Park from 9am to 3pm.  Visitors will be able to take self guided tours through the historic Swiss Village, view the state of the art SVF facilities and meet the laboratory, veterinary and animal care staff, attend cryogenics and sheep sheering demonstrations, visit Chip, a Tennessee myotonic goat born from a frozen embryo, learn about endangered breeds of livestock and shop farm products and heritage breed meat.

The SVF Foundation’s goal is to preserve rare and endangered breeds of livestock.  They focus on genetic preservation of cattle, sheep, and goats.  They store semen, embryos, cells and blood in liquid nitrogen until those genetics are needed for agricultural use. This program was a 20 year project focused on preserving endangered breeds.  On average, 1 breed goes extinct per month, and the SVF Foundation is working to eliminate that.  There is no other program like this one. They improve the environment around the animals and keep the genetics ready for when they are needed.

Newport Art Museum

June 6th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

The Newport Art Museum, accredited fully by the American Association of Museums, holds collections and exhibitions that reflect Rhode Island’s cultural heritage and contemporary art scene.  They have been a cultural gathering place for over 100 years and have a reputation for high quality exhibitions and programs.  They are the only museum that focuses on the art and artists of Rhode Island.  They also have an art school, the Minnie and Jimmy Coleman Center for Creative Studies (founded in 1913) that encourages people of all ages to attend art classes, camps and workshops in order to explore their creativity.

The Newport Art Museum has a permanent collection of over 2,300 works of American art.  This art focuses on artistic activity from the late 19th century to the present day, as well as works that emphasize the role Newport and New England artists had in the development of American art.newport-art-museum-1[1]

Some of the artists displayed in the Newport Art Museum are:  19th and 20th century artists William Trost Richards, John Frederick Kensett and George Bellows, impressionists, Howard Gardiner Cushing and Helena Sturtevant, and contemporary artists such as Dale Chihuly, Italo Scanga, Aaron Siskind and Toots Zynsky, among many others.

Special Exhibitions are taken from the permanent collections as well as other museums and private collections.  They display a variety of themes and are accompanied by special programs.  Three current exhibitions are: Elizabeth Congdon: Heaven and Earth (May 10th-August 12th), Mary Chatowski Jameson: Marine Botanicals (May 17th-Spetember 1st), Corrine Colarusso: Magic Gold, Full Sun (May 17th-Septemeber 7th), and “Very Simple Charm,” the Early Life and Work of Richard Morris Hunt in Newport (May 31st-September 14th).

The Newport Art Museum hosts a variety of events throughout the year including gallery nights and talks, Murder at the Museum nights, lectures, lunch with artists, a variety of workshops and more.

Newport Restoration Foundation

May 30th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

The non-profit organization – Newport Restoration Foundation – was founded by Doris Duke in 1968 with the purpose of preserving, interpreting, and maintaining landscape and objects reflecting architectural culture of the 18th and 19th century on Aquidneck Island.  It maintains this mission by being a leader in historic preservation in Newport Country, preserving a collection of the arts of cabinetmaking and art and artifacts from Doris Duke and using these collections for educational purposes.  Since its start, the Newport Restoration Foundation has preserved or restored 83 buildings, and owns 78 historic buildings, most of which are rented as private residences.  This is one of the largest collections of period architecture in the country owned by a single organization.

Besides their commitment to maintaining the historic architecture of the area, the Newport Restoration Foundation also owns and operates three properties that are open to the public as museums.  These include Rough Point – the mansion owned by Doris Duke, the Whitehorne House – which houses a collection of 18th Century Newport furniture, and Prescott Farm – an example of early American architecture and landscape.

The Newport Restoration Foundation also runs a variety of history tours that help visitors learn about different aspects of Newport’s magnificent history. “Discover Colonial Newport,” is a tour that involves revolution and ruin and the struggles for religious liberty in Newport.  “From Golden to Gilded” takes visitors through the transformation of Newport from a colonial age to a gilded summer colony. “Rum and Revolution” discusses the booming rum trade and its activity throughout the Prohibition era.  “Souls & Stones” takes guests to the Common Burying Ground and explores the art of gravestone carving and discusses the diverse group of people buried there.  These are just a few of the great historic tours offered.  All tours leave from the Museum and Shop at the Brick Market Place on Thames Street and last about 75 minutes.

The Great Chowder Cook-Off and Oyster Festival

May 23rd, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

For the past 32 years, The Great Chowder Cook-Off helps kick off summer in the beginning of June.  This year, the 33rd Annual Polar Seltzer Great Chowder Cook-Off will take place on Saturday, June 7th, from noon to 6pm, at the Newport Yachting Center.  As an added bonus, the Newport Oyster Festival will coincide with the Chowder Cook-Off and your ticket to the cook-off will get you in the festival as well.  The Oyster Festival will last until 8pm.

The Polar Seltzer Great Chowder Cook-off has been featured on both the Food Network and the Travel Channel and is the longest running chowder championship.  It draws its competitors from across the countrchowder picturey such as California, Washington, New Jersey, North Carolina, Florida, as well as New England favorites.  Those in attendance get to taste endless samples of traditional chowders as well as “exotic” variations.  Voting will take place for three categories: clam, seafood and creative.  The great restaurants who win end up with prizes and bragging rights for the next year.  Among the chowder tastings, many other things will be happening.  There will be a “Clamcake Chow Down” where participants race to consume a half-dozen clam cakes.  Live music will be performing on various stages, and Stop & Shop will be sponsoring culinary demonstrations throughout the day.

When you’re all chowdered out, or the cook-off is over, your ticchowder cook-offket gets you into the Newport Oyster Festival.  Local shellfish and seafood will be available, farmers market style.  Some highlights of the Festival include: raw bars and other seafood favorites, full bar, live acoustic music, bistro-style seating, educational presentations and contests.  You can compete in oyster and beer shucking or oyster slurping competitions.

For more information or to see who will be competing this year, check out the Polar Seltzer Great Chowder Cook-Off website here.

 

Green Animals Topiary Garden is Open for the Season

May 16th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

The Green Animals Topiary Garden opened for the season last week.  As part of the Preservation Society of Newport County, this mansion, located in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, gives visitors the chance to visit the oldest and most northern Topiary Garden in the United States.

This seven acre estate was purchased in 1872 by Thomas E. Brayton as a summer home.  His gardener, Joseph Carreiro, and son-in-law, George Mendonca, were responsible for creating the topiaries.  The gardens, which include more than 80 pieces of topiary, almost completely outshine the house.  The estate includes sculptured trees and shrubs in the shapes of various animals like camels and giraffes, flower beds, and fruit and vegetable gardens.  The white wood frame house contains family furnishings and has become a small toy museum.green-animals-topiary-garden-main[1]

Brayton’s daughter, Alice, gave the estate it’s name, the Green Animals Topiary Garden, and became a permanent residence there in 1939.  At the age of 94, Alice passed away and left her estate to the Preservation Society of Newport County and is still considered one of the finest Topiary Gardens in the United States.

The Atlantic Cup is Back in Newport

May 9th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

The Atlantic Cup is a three-leg event held in Charleston, New York and Newport, that showcases some of the top Class 40 Sailors in the U.S. and world.  Presented by 11th Hour Racing, this is the only racing event dedicated to Class 40 sailing, as well as one of the most environmentally sustainable races in the U.S.  The 2012 race was the first carbon neutral race and this years race will aim for the same thing.  Participating teams will be required to have an alternative energy source, such as fuel cells or solar panels.

There are three legs of the Atlantic Cup, which begin in Charleston, South Carolina on May 10th.  This leg is a long offshore race that will be raced double handed.  The second leg starts on May 17th in New York and is a shorter, double-handed, offshore sprint.  Finally, the race ends in Newport and takes things inshore.  The last leg starts on May 24th and takes place in Narragansett Bay, with a maximum crew of six.  The race incorporates both offshore and inshore racing so that the competitors are skilled in two different sailing disciplines: ocean and buoy racing.  This makes the event competitive and guarantees the winner is a “complete sailor.”  The two types of racing also levels the playing field against different yacht designs and makes the competition extremely close.

The combined overall winner of the three legs becomes the Atlantic Cup Champion.  Last years winner was Bodacious Dream, who held the first place seat the entire duration of the race.  They had previously came in 2nd in the 2012 America’s Cup race.

The third leg in Newport spans two day, which are filled with sailing and events for everyone.  Racing takes place on May 24th and 25th from 11am to 4pm.  Other activities associated with the event will start as early as the 22nd.logo[1]

Jane Pickens Theater

May 2nd, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

If you’re looking to see a movie without leaving the city limits of Newport, the Jane Pickens Theater and Event Center is your destination.  It is the only movie house in the downtown area and is known for the films it screens and the events that take place there.  800px-Jane_Pickens_Theater_Newport_RIThe theater shows the best movies available, screening a variety of first run movies, classic films and documentaries.  The theater and event space have are based on history and their goal is to make their events memorable for community members and visitors alike.  The Jane Pickens Theater also does a lot of fundraising for various community non-profits.  It is one of America’s oldest theater buildings and it is important for them to maintain the historic importance of the building.

The theater is located in Washington Square, which is only a few blocks from the Inn, and was built in 1834.  It was originally the Zion Episcopal Church but became a theater in 1919, originally called The Strand.

The theater was renamed by the then owner, Joe Jarvis, in 1974, after Jane Pickens, an accomplished singer, actress, politician and philanthropist. Jane and her sister Patti performed at the dedication and renaming of the theater. 220px-Jane_Pickens Jane split here time between New York City and Newport, eventually retiring to Newport, after her success as a singer, radio host, Broadway actress and Republican Congress candidate.  Here she maintained her impressive involvement with charity.

The Staabs purchased the theater in 2004 and continued to keep the entertainment alive, renaming the theater, a year later, to the Jane Pickens Theater & Event Center, in order to include the special events that were becoming an important part of the theater.  A preservation group called the Friends of the Jane Pickens was created in 2008 to help maintain the building for the long term and to enhance the use of the theater for education.

For showtimes and event schedules, visit the Jane Pickens Website.

 

Newport’s Very Own 3rd Annual Craft Beer Festival

April 25th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

Tomorrow, Saturday, April 26th, Newport Storm and Pour Judgement Bar and Grill are sponsoring the 3rd Annual Newport Craft Beer Festival to benefit the Rhode Island Brewers Guild and Newport Historical Society. There will be two sessions, one from 12pm to 3pm and the second from 4pm to 7pm at the Great Friends Meeting House. This is a 21 and over event.

This festival is a celebration of Newport’s brewing history, which dates back to before the American Revolution. Brewers from all over the country will have samples of a variety of different craft beers for attendees to try. Food from local restaurants will be available for purchase, and music will be going throughout the event. It’s a great opportunity to mingle with American Brewers and try a great selection of craft beers.

Some of the brewing companies that will be in attendance are: Newport Storm, Union Station Brewering, Grey Sail Brewing of Rhode Island, Revival Brewing, Bucket Brewery, Sebago Brewing Company, Woodstock Inn Brewery, Stone Brewing Co., Lagunitas Brewing Co., Green Flash, Lexington Brewing Co., Harpoon Brewery, Sixpoint Brewery, Boulder Brewing Co., Clown Shoes, Goose Island, Heavy Seas, and many more.

Tickets are available until the sell out. They can be purchased here through tonight, or at the event tomorrow, again, until they are sold out.bridge festival logo

Celebrating Newport’s 375th Anniversary

April 18th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

Ann Hutchinson and her followers left Boston and settled on Aquidneck Island in order to gain religious freedom.  After a few years, in 1639, the settlement divided, and a group led by William Codington and Nicholas Easton moved south and formed Newport.  The founders were dedicated to religious freedom, and Newport became one of the first secular democracies in the Atlantic.  Many Quakers and Jews were attracted to this religious freedom and settled on the island.  The town transformed from a small agricultural outpost to one of the five leading seaports in colonial America.

Although there were a variety of religions practiced in Newport, the Quakers became the most influential, dominating political, social and economical life.  Their plain lifestyle was reflected in architecture, landscape and decorative arts.   They were some of the finest craftsman, who made extraordinary furniture. Newport’s architectural heritage can be traced back to the 17th century, when building such as the Old Stone Mill and the White Horse Tavern were built.  Newport’s economics were based on exporting rum, candles, fish, silver and furniture, which fueled their economic growth.  The water front was very busy during this time, and over 150 separate wharves and shops crowded the harbor.  Trade grew, and Newport became an epicenter of modern American capitalism, becoming one of the five leading ports in North America by 1760.  This growth led to a “building boom,” including hundreds of houses and important structures such as the Trinity Church, Colony House, Redwood Library and Brick Market.

The British held Newport from 1776-1779 and hundreds fled.  The British remained until they were driven out by the French, who then stayed until 1783. Due to the damage the British had done to Newport’s economy, Newport had to re-invent itself in the 1900’s.  It transformed into a summer resort area.  Newport became a center for influential writers, artists, educators, scientists, architects and landscape designers during the antebellum period.  Wealthy families such as the Griswolds, Kings and Vanderbilts built mansions in Newport to use as their summer cottages.

Newport maintained its ties to the seas and trading ships filled the water.  Newport started becoming a yachting capital and in the 1930’s, America’s Cup was brought to Newport until 1983.  The Navy also became an important part of Newport and have been based here since the 1860’s.  The Naval War College and Torpedo Station were built after the Civil War and the Navy presence grew.  Today, the Navy is still the largest employer in the area.

After World War II, a preservation movement saved hundreds of structures throughout Newport County.  The Newport Historical Society, Preservation Society of Newport County and the Newport Restoration Foundation were formed, and “Heritage Tourism” became a popular pull for tourists, and helped boost the economy.  Now there are a variety of reasons to visit Newport, whether you’re interested in history, beautiful scenery or an active boating life.

This year, Newport is celebrating its 375th Anniversary.  It will be a year long celebration featuring family activities, lectures, educational programs and public celebrations.  Some activities include: a scavenger hunt, community cookout, community parade, musical tributes, public clambake and a gala at the end of the year.

 

 

 

»