The Atlantic Cup is Back in Newport

May 9th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

The Atlantic Cup is a three-leg event held in Charleston, New York and Newport, that showcases some of the top Class 40 Sailors in the U.S. and world.  Presented by 11th Hour Racing, this is the only racing event dedicated to Class 40 sailing, as well as one of the most environmentally sustainable races in the U.S.  The 2012 race was the first carbon neutral race and this years race will aim for the same thing.  Participating teams will be required to have an alternative energy source, such as fuel cells or solar panels.

There are three legs of the Atlantic Cup, which begin in Charleston, South Carolina on May 10th.  This leg is a long offshore race that will be raced double handed.  The second leg starts on May 17th in New York and is a shorter, double-handed, offshore sprint.  Finally, the race ends in Newport and takes things inshore.  The last leg starts on May 24th and takes place in Narragansett Bay, with a maximum crew of six.  The race incorporates both offshore and inshore racing so that the competitors are skilled in two different sailing disciplines: ocean and buoy racing.  This makes the event competitive and guarantees the winner is a “complete sailor.”  The two types of racing also levels the playing field against different yacht designs and makes the competition extremely close.

The combined overall winner of the three legs becomes the Atlantic Cup Champion.  Last years winner was Bodacious Dream, who held the first place seat the entire duration of the race.  They had previously came in 2nd in the 2012 America’s Cup race.

The third leg in Newport spans two day, which are filled with sailing and events for everyone.  Racing takes place on May 24th and 25th from 11am to 4pm.  Other activities associated with the event will start as early as the 22nd.logo[1]

Jane Pickens Theater

May 2nd, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

If you’re looking to see a movie without leaving the city limits of Newport, the Jane Pickens Theater and Event Center is your destination.  It is the only movie house in the downtown area and is known for the films it screens and the events that take place there.  800px-Jane_Pickens_Theater_Newport_RIThe theater shows the best movies available, screening a variety of first run movies, classic films and documentaries.  The theater and event space have are based on history and their goal is to make their events memorable for community members and visitors alike.  The Jane Pickens Theater also does a lot of fundraising for various community non-profits.  It is one of America’s oldest theater buildings and it is important for them to maintain the historic importance of the building.

The theater is located in Washington Square, which is only a few blocks from the Inn, and was built in 1834.  It was originally the Zion Episcopal Church but became a theater in 1919, originally called The Strand.

The theater was renamed by the then owner, Joe Jarvis, in 1974, after Jane Pickens, an accomplished singer, actress, politician and philanthropist. Jane and her sister Patti performed at the dedication and renaming of the theater. 220px-Jane_Pickens Jane split here time between New York City and Newport, eventually retiring to Newport, after her success as a singer, radio host, Broadway actress and Republican Congress candidate.  Here she maintained her impressive involvement with charity.

The Staabs purchased the theater in 2004 and continued to keep the entertainment alive, renaming the theater, a year later, to the Jane Pickens Theater & Event Center, in order to include the special events that were becoming an important part of the theater.  A preservation group called the Friends of the Jane Pickens was created in 2008 to help maintain the building for the long term and to enhance the use of the theater for education.

For showtimes and event schedules, visit the Jane Pickens Website.

 

Newport’s Very Own 3rd Annual Craft Beer Festival

April 25th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

Tomorrow, Saturday, April 26th, Newport Storm and Pour Judgement Bar and Grill are sponsoring the 3rd Annual Newport Craft Beer Festival to benefit the Rhode Island Brewers Guild and Newport Historical Society. There will be two sessions, one from 12pm to 3pm and the second from 4pm to 7pm at the Great Friends Meeting House. This is a 21 and over event.

This festival is a celebration of Newport’s brewing history, which dates back to before the American Revolution. Brewers from all over the country will have samples of a variety of different craft beers for attendees to try. Food from local restaurants will be available for purchase, and music will be going throughout the event. It’s a great opportunity to mingle with American Brewers and try a great selection of craft beers.

Some of the brewing companies that will be in attendance are: Newport Storm, Union Station Brewering, Grey Sail Brewing of Rhode Island, Revival Brewing, Bucket Brewery, Sebago Brewing Company, Woodstock Inn Brewery, Stone Brewing Co., Lagunitas Brewing Co., Green Flash, Lexington Brewing Co., Harpoon Brewery, Sixpoint Brewery, Boulder Brewing Co., Clown Shoes, Goose Island, Heavy Seas, and many more.

Tickets are available until the sell out. They can be purchased here through tonight, or at the event tomorrow, again, until they are sold out.bridge festival logo

Celebrating Newport’s 375th Anniversary

April 18th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

Ann Hutchinson and her followers left Boston and settled on Aquidneck Island in order to gain religious freedom.  After a few years, in 1639, the settlement divided, and a group led by William Codington and Nicholas Easton moved south and formed Newport.  The founders were dedicated to religious freedom, and Newport became one of the first secular democracies in the Atlantic.  Many Quakers and Jews were attracted to this religious freedom and settled on the island.  The town transformed from a small agricultural outpost to one of the five leading seaports in colonial America.

Although there were a variety of religions practiced in Newport, the Quakers became the most influential, dominating political, social and economical life.  Their plain lifestyle was reflected in architecture, landscape and decorative arts.   They were some of the finest craftsman, who made extraordinary furniture. Newport’s architectural heritage can be traced back to the 17th century, when building such as the Old Stone Mill and the White Horse Tavern were built.  Newport’s economics were based on exporting rum, candles, fish, silver and furniture, which fueled their economic growth.  The water front was very busy during this time, and over 150 separate wharves and shops crowded the harbor.  Trade grew, and Newport became an epicenter of modern American capitalism, becoming one of the five leading ports in North America by 1760.  This growth led to a “building boom,” including hundreds of houses and important structures such as the Trinity Church, Colony House, Redwood Library and Brick Market.

The British held Newport from 1776-1779 and hundreds fled.  The British remained until they were driven out by the French, who then stayed until 1783. Due to the damage the British had done to Newport’s economy, Newport had to re-invent itself in the 1900′s.  It transformed into a summer resort area.  Newport became a center for influential writers, artists, educators, scientists, architects and landscape designers during the antebellum period.  Wealthy families such as the Griswolds, Kings and Vanderbilts built mansions in Newport to use as their summer cottages.

Newport maintained its ties to the seas and trading ships filled the water.  Newport started becoming a yachting capital and in the 1930′s, America’s Cup was brought to Newport until 1983.  The Navy also became an important part of Newport and have been based here since the 1860′s.  The Naval War College and Torpedo Station were built after the Civil War and the Navy presence grew.  Today, the Navy is still the largest employer in the area.

After World War II, a preservation movement saved hundreds of structures throughout Newport County.  The Newport Historical Society, Preservation Society of Newport County and the Newport Restoration Foundation were formed, and “Heritage Tourism” became a popular pull for tourists, and helped boost the economy.  Now there are a variety of reasons to visit Newport, whether you’re interested in history, beautiful scenery or an active boating life.

This year, Newport is celebrating its 375th Anniversary.  It will be a year long celebration featuring family activities, lectures, educational programs and public celebrations.  Some activities include: a scavenger hunt, community cookout, community parade, musical tributes, public clambake and a gala at the end of the year.

 

 

 

Doris Duke House: Rough Point

April 11th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

In Newport, Rhode Island, Doris Duke was a lifelong preservationist and devoted much of her fortune to restoring colonial buildings in the city where she spent her summersRough_Point,_Newport_RI. She founded the Newport Restoration Foundation in 1968 with the purpose of preserving Newport’s 18th- and 19th-century architectural heritage. Her extraordinary vision resulted in an almost single-handed rescue of Newport’s early architectural heritage. Newport thrives today in large part due to its many unique historic streetscapes.

Doris Duke, the only child of James Buchanan Duke, was born on November 22, 1912. Her father was a founder of the American Tobacco Company and the Duke Power Company, as well as a benefactor of Duke University. When Mr. Duke died in 1925, he left his 12-year old daughter an estate estimated at $80 million.

As a collector, Duke spent much of her time traveling the world, amassing coudoris-dukentless treasures and notable collections of Islamic and Southeast Asian art. She also traveled throughout Europe building her collection of fine art and furniture, much of which she used to furnish Rough Point, her home in Newport. She left Rough Point, intact as she lived in it, to the Newport Restoration Foundation to be opened as a museum. Two of her other homes are also open to the public. Visit Shangri-La in Hawaii which is home to an impressive collection of Islamic art. Explore Duke Farms, Doris’s 2,700 acre New Jersey estate featuring remarkable outdoor resources such as walking trails, gardens and environmental programs.

Doris Duke gave away more than $400 million to various causes during her lifetime, often as anonymous contributions. Upon her death in 1993, she left her vast fortune to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation which supports the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and the prevention of child abuse.

Newport Storm: A Rhode Island Microbrewery

April 4th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

If you like trying local beers and you’re in Newport, the place to visit is the Coastal Extreme Brewing, more commonly known as the Newport Storm Brewery.  Brent, Derek, Mark and Will, four friends who were attending Colby decided that the best thing to do after graduation would be to start a brewery.  The idea began to take shape in 1997 and over the following year and a half, they collected information, wrote plans and approached investors.  They moved into a 2500 square foot garage bay in 1999, bought some used equipment and released their first beer, Hurricane Amber Ale, on July 2nd of that year.get-attachment[1]

Since that point, the brewery has continued to grow.  They added 1000 square feet in 2002 and in 2006, they started the Newport Distilling Company, which makes Thomas Tew Rum.  The brewery and distillery moved to a brand new facility in 2010, where they’re still currently located, which includes a visitors center and tour deck.  This was also when they upgraded their equipment.  Since their start in 1999, they have made over 30 kinds of beers, including a variety of limited releases.  Their beer is sold throughout Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

These four friends still love what they do, and want to share their products with everyone.  The Newport Storm visitors center is open Wednesday through Monday from 12pm to 5pm, with guided tours leaving daily at 3pm.  While there you can taste the beers they have on tap as well as three stages of their Thomas Tew Rum.  They participate in a variety of events, such as the Great International Spring Beer Festival and the Newport Craft Beer Festival.  They also host tastings at local liquor stores and host pint nights at local restaurants and an Annual Luau at Fort Adams every summer.

Newport Restaurant Week: Spring 2014

March 28th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

Twice a year, Newport Restaurants put together special three course lunch and dinner menus for $16 and $35, respectively, and participate in Newport Restaurant Week.  One is in April and the other November.  This year, the springtime restaurant week will be held from April 4th to the 13th, which is only a week away!

restaurant week meals

Castle Hill Inn – Restaurant Week November 2013

It’s not a surprise that many of the restaurants in Newport can get a bit pricey when you start ordering multiple courses, so restaurant week is a great opportunity to try everything without spending an entire paycheck.  Along the same lines, its a great way to enjoy amazing food at restaurants you have yet to try.

Some of our favorite restaurants here at the Marshall Slocum Inn are The Mooring, 22 Bowens, Thames Street Kitchen, Tallulah on Thames, Castle Hill Inn, Diego’s and Cafe Zelda’s.  Most of these are located within walking distance of the Inn and you are sure to have a great meal.

For more information and to make reservations visit the Restaurant Week website here.

BedandBreakfast.com Sweet To Beat Finalist

March 27th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

 

MARSHALL SLOCUM INN SELECTED AS ONE OF 16 FINALISTS

FOR BEST B&B BREAKFAST IN NORTH AMERICA

 

Breakfast Lovers and B&B Fans to Select Favorite Recipes in BedandBreakfast.com’s

Best B&B Breakfast Tournament

FB_IK-promote_Marshall-Slocum

AUSTIN, TX, March 27, 2014 – Starting today, breakfast lovers and B&B fans are invited to help select the best B&B breakfast in North America during the BedandBreakfast.com® Best B&B Breakfast Tournament™.  The Marshall Slocum Inn, in Newport, RI, is one of 16 bed and breakfasts to make the cut for the two-week “sweets to beat” recipe battle for the best B&B breakfast.

The Marshall Slocum Inn was selected by guest judges for its Banana Stuffed Cinnamon French Toast. 

BedandBreakfast.com’s Best B&B Breakfast Tournament contest works in brackets, much like the NCAA Basketball®’s March Madness®, with BedandBreakfast.com’s Facebook® fans voting on their favorites.  The recipes in each bracket winning the most votes move on to the next round of eight, four, and the final two, which will battle it out in a “sweets to beat” showdown on April 10.  The winner will be announced April 11.

Click here for a list of the Sweet 16 finalists.

The Sweet 16 were chosen based on recipe creativity, uniqueness and appeal by guest judges including Anne Banas, SmarterTravel.com;  Genevieve Shaw Brown, ABC News; Adrien Glover, Travel + Leisure;  and Larry Olmsted,  USAToday.com Great American Bites columnist.

In the past two years, sweet beat out savory.  In 2013, the winning recipe was the Lemon Soufflé Pancakes with Blueberry Compote from the 1851 Historic Maple Hill Manor Bed and Breakfast in Springfield, Kentucky.  In 2012 (the inaugural year), the Bittersweet Chocolate Waffles Topped with Mint Butter Cream and Strawberry Sauce from the Lyttleton Inn in Littleton, Mass. won first place.

Go to BedandBreakfast.com’s Facebook page from March 27 to April 10 to vote for the best B&B breakfasts.

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About BedandBreakfast.com

BedandBreakfast.com, based in Austin, Texas, is the most comprehensive global site for finding bed and breakfast properties, with more than 12,000 properties worldwide, representing nearly 75,000 rooms. BedandBreakfast.com helps travelers find and book the ideal B&B or small inn through informative descriptions, photos, and more than 300,000 consumer reviews.  BedandBreakfast.com offers convenient gift cards welcomed at more than 4,000 B&Bs in the United States and Canada, with no restrictions or blackout dates. It is owned by HomeAway, Inc., the worldwide leader in online vacation rentals. 

 

CONTACTS:

Mark Spring, for Marshall Slocum Inn, 401-841-5120, info@marshallslocuminn.com

Denise Clarke, for BedandBreakfast.com, 512.899.0004, denise@deniseclarkePR.com

Cliffwalk Set to Reopen in June

March 21st, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

Cliffwalk is probably the most popular attraction in Newport, and it may just be the most popular attraction in all of Rhode Island.  It is one of the most scenic trails in the state and offers 3.5 miles of ocean views on one side, and historic mansions on the other.  The walk starts at the west end of Easton’s Beach on Memorial Boulevard and ends on Bellevue Avenue at the east end of Bailey’s Beach.  There are multiple access points along the way, including Narragansett Avenue and Ruggles Avenue. cliffwalk picture

Cliffwalk was designated as a National Recreation Trail in 1975 and is in a National Historic District.  It is the 65th National Recreation Trail and the first one in New England.  Although much of the trail is easy walking, the southern half had some rough terrain and proper footwear should be worn.  Unfortunately, in 2012, Hurricane Sandy destroyed much of the southern half of the trail and since then only the section from Memorial Boulevard to Ruggles Avenue has been open.

Reconstruction of the southern end has been in the works, and it is projected to be completed by June.  Supplemental funding has been found for the project, which increases the budget by $2 million.  Most of the time projects need to be downsized, but since the addition of funds, they will be able to add a 60-foot section of stone masonry at the corner of Rough Point and a 200 foot form liner at Miramar, which will better stabilize the path.  The official reopening of the damaged portion of Cliffwalk is set for June 13, 2014, just in time for the 2014 summer season.

The Breakers: A Vanderbilt Mansion

March 14th, 2014 by Marshall Slocum Inn

The Breakers is by far the most famous mansion in Newport.  If you only see one mansion while visiting, most will choose the Breakers.  Today, this giant “palace” measures 250 feet by 150 feet and contains 70 rooms, over four floors. Millions of visitors have visited the Breakers since it became open to the public in the 1970′s.

Cornelius Vanderbilt II bought the property and original Breakers in 1885 from Pierre Lorillard to be used as a summer home for his family.  The original building burned down in 1892, which resulted in a mRichard_Morris_Huntuch larger version being built, modeled after the Renaissance palaces in Genoa and Turin.  Work began in 1893 and took just over two years to complete.  Hundreds of workers helped lay the stones and whole rooms were built in Europe and then shipped to Newport.

Richard Morris Hunt was the architect for the Breakers, who worked on many other Newport mansions, including Ochre Point and Marble House.  Hunt died before the Breakers was complete, but wished to be remembered for the stick-style cottages he built early in his career.  However his fame rests with the Breakers and other stone palaces.

This was Vanderbilt’s second home and as it was being built, the anticipation grew.  There were many rumors surrounding The Breakersthe art and amenities of the mansion, and on August 14th, 1895, those rumors were put to rest at the combined house-warming/coming-out party of Gertrude Vanderbilt.  Over 300 guests were in attendance and were greeted by the great hall, which rises nearly 50 feet and is lined with Caen stone.  The East wall, made almost entirely of glass allows for a view to the lawn, ocean and the reef that gave the Breakers its name.  Guests marveled at the two story dining room and “grotto-like” billiards room. The two-level kitchen, the size of a normal size house had sealed doors that no odors could escape from.

Cornelius VanderCornelius_Vanderbilt_II_by_John_Singer_Sargent_(1856-1925)bilt II was the grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt, who started the family fortune.  He was worth more than $70 million, but worked as a bank clerk, making $50 a month and lived on that salary.  He worked long hours and became the chairman of the family’s railroad empire.   He married Alice Claypoole Gwynne and was a devoted husband.  The Vanderbilts were not known for their entertaining because of the amount of time that Vanderbilt dedicated to his family business and philanthropy.  He donated his time and more than a million dollars a year to various charities and much of it was anonymous.  Unfortunately, a year after the Breakers opened, Vanderbilt suffered a stroke.  He died three years later at the age of 56.

Countess Laszlo Szechenyi (Gladys Vanderbilt) leased the Breakers to the Preservation Society of Newport County for $1.00 a year in order to raise funds for the restoration of the Hunter House.  It was finally acquired in 1972, and millions have been visiting ever since.

 

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